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New USDA report examines pathogen-based import refusals

Identifying contaminants in imported foods and refusing contaminated shipments help minimize the risk of foodborne illness from foreign products.

USDA

December 17, 2021

1 Min Read
New USDA report examines pathogen-based import refusals

From 2002 to 2019, Salmonella food import violations identified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accounted for 80% of all pathogen/toxin violations, followed by Listeria at 11%.
 
Identifying adulterants in imported foods and refusing contaminated shipments help minimize the risk of foodborne illness from foreign products and are essential to keep U.S. consumers safe. While data capable of estimating the risk of foodborne illness from foreign producers is limited, U.S. import refusal data list the most common reasons why foreign shipments were refused. 
 
A new report by USDA’s Economic Research Service, "Examining Pathogen-Based Import Refusals: Trends and Analysis From 2002 to 2019," examines changes in imported shipments that were refused due to pathogen/toxin violations using data from the FDA from 2002 to 2019.
 
To learn more, please refer to the full report.
 

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