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Articles from 2017 In April


2017 World Pork Expo New Product Tour

Pork industry innovators have been busy this year coming up with a variety of new products to help producers save money and improve efficiency. National Hog Farmer is pleased to offer our readers and World Pork Expo attendees an opportunity to learn more about new products and services recently introduced to the pork industry.

National Hog Farmer is excited to announce that its New Product Tour has gone digital and the vote is on. Starting today and continuing through Friday noon of World Pork Expo, visitors can scroll this year’s list of 31 new products and vote for their favorite. The product receiving the most votes will be awarded the 2017 Producer Choice Award.

Get a head start on the new product tour by taking a look at the new product nominations featured in this gallery. Select your favorite new product and cast your vote here. When you cast your vote, you are automatically entered in a drawing for an Amazon Gift Card. The product with the most votes cast by World Pork Expo attendees will be featured as the “producer’s choice” new product.

How many are still operating?


Orion Samuelson wonders if any single-room schoolhouses are still operating.

Samuelson Sez is a special feature of This Week in Agribusiness where Orion Samuelson shares his thoughts and insights into key issues of the day.

Chapter Tribute: Naperville Central FFA

Max Armstrong profiles Naperville Central FFA, Naperville, Illinois, this 25-member chapter was originally formed in 1938. Chapter member Emily Dziegimiski talks about how their group tries to raise awareness of ag in their urban community.

The weekly FFA Chapter Tribute is an opportunity to shine a spotlight on the good work of your local chapter. Tell us about what you're doing, give us some history from your group and tell our viewers of the work you do in the community. FFA chapters across the country deserve recognition for the work they do, make sure we include yours.

To have your chapter considered for this weekly feature, send along information about your group by e-mail to Orion Samuelson at Orion@AgBizWeek.com or to Max Armstrong at Max@AgBizWeek.com. They'll get your group on the list of those that will be covered in the future. It's a chance to share your story beyond the local community. Drop Orion or Max a "line" soon.

The National FFA Organization, formerly known as Future Farmers of America, is a national youth organization of about 650,000 student members as part of 7,757 local FFA chapters. The National FFA Organization remains committed to the individual student, providing a path to achievement in premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. For more, visit the National FFA Organization online www.ffa.org, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nationalffa, on Twitter at twitter.com/nationalffa.

                                                                

This Week in Agribusiness, April 29, 2017

Part 1

Max Armstrong opens this week's show by congratulating Sonny Perdue, the newly confirmed Secretary of Agriculture. Patrick Haggerty reports on Sonny Perdue being sworn in, where Secretary Perdue rolled up his sleeves, and reminds people he was a farmer first. Nick Jensen, President, Thurston Manufacturing, tackles the Farm Challenge of the Week. And Farm broadcaster Duane Murley, KWMT Radio, from Fort Dodge, Iowa, offers insight into key issues farmers in that part of the country are watching.

Part 2

Max Armstrong talks markets with Paul Georgy, Allendale, Inc. In Samuelson Sez, Orion Samuelson wonders if any single-room schoolhouses are still operating. And Agricultural Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at weather for the Western United States.

Part 3

Matt Coniglio, Penton Ag, talks about the many opportunities available at the National Agri-Marketing Association. Chad Colby reports on the crops in central and southern Illinois.

Part 4

Max Armstrong talks with Roberta Simpson-Dolbeare, Nebo, Illinois, about utilizing technology with smart farms. Ag Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at weather for the Eastern United States. And in Max's Tractor Shed, Max tells the story of a 1951 John Deere B, owned by Rhett Whaley, Bloomfield, Indiana.

Part 5

Max Armstrong continues his market conversation with Paul Georgy, Allendale, Inc.

Part 6

Max Armstrong profiles Naperville Central FFA, Naperville, Illinois, this 25-member chapter formed in 1938. And Ag Meteorologist Greg Soulje looks at the weather for the week ahead, including his four-week forecast.

Part 7

In Freeways to Farms with Max Armstrong, Max talks with Jamie Walter, Whiskey Acres, about how he uses technology to maximize his operation. More episodes of Freeways to Farms can be found online at Freewaystofarms.com.

1951 John Deere B

Max Armstrong tells the story of a 1951 John Deere B, owned by Rhett Whaley, Bloomfield, Indiana.

Max's Tractor Shed is a regular feature of This Week in Agribusiness. Max Armstrong shares information about legacy machines, their stories and how they may still be at work today. If you have a tractor you want featured in Max's Tractor Shed, send a high-resolution digital picture, your contact information, and information about the tractor - what makes it special - to max@agbizweek.com.

MIDDAY-MidwestDigest-04-28-17

Max is wrapping things up at National Agri Marketing Association event in Dallas, Texas.

United Airlines settled with dragged passenger for undisclosed amount of money.

Simon the rabbit died in pet holding area of United Airlines. Former Playboy model from England is owner and said rabbit was healthy when put on flight in England.

What a difference four years can make. Boom ended and money dried up in Oklahoma.

Woman in Omaha gave birth at Omaha Zoo. Mom was still standing up because it happened so fast and Dad caught baby in a sweater.

MIDDAY-MidwestDigest-04-28-17

Max is wrapping things up at National Agri Marketing Association event in Dallas, Texas.

United Airlines settled with dragged passenger for undisclosed amount of money.

Simon the rabbit died in pet holding area of United Airlines. Former Playboy model from England is owner and said rabbit was healthy when put on flight in England.

What a difference four years can make. Boom ended and money dried up in Oklahoma.

Woman in Omaha gave birth at Omaha Zoo. Mom was still standing up because it happened so fast and Dad caught baby in a sweater.

MORNING-MidwestDigest-04-28-17

Max is wrapping things up in Dallas at National Agri-Marketing event.

What a difference four years can make. Four years ago Oklahoma's oil patch was booming. Republicans who control state government permanently reduced tax income rate and gave tax incentives to businesses. Now, the boom has ended and the money has dried up. Nearly 100 of the state's 513 school districts have moved to four-day weeks. State troopers are told not to fill their gas tanks.

United Airlines is trying to get dragged passenger ordeal behind them and settled with the 69-year-old passenger yesterday. Meanwhile, the airline is still dogged with questions about what happened to Simon, the giant rabbit, who died while in the care of the airline. He was alive when landed in Chicago and it died as waited for flight to Kansas City. Three-foot-long Simon was expected to be the world's biggest rabbit.

Alcohol banned in Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, but allowed across the border in Nebraska. Officials there are trying to ban.

Chances are you've ate at a Waffle House, there are 1,500 across the country. The owners have recently passed away.

Farm Progress America, April 28, 2017

FarmProgressAmerica_FeatureIMG

The North American Free Trade Agreement has been in the news lately and Max Armstrong offers a look at what the agreement has meant to farmers, and other industries in the U.S. Exports to those countries have grown three-fold as imports grew six fold in the same time period. He shares a list of the top ag products sold to Canada and Mexico.

Farm Progress America is a daily look at key issues in agriculture. It is produced and presented by Max Armstrong, veteran farm broadcaster and host of This Week in Agribusiness.

Perdue welcomed with open arms

USDA Sonny Perdue, with his wife Mary, takes the oath of office administered by Associate Justice Clarence Thomas in the U.S. Supreme Court Building, becoming the 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture.
Sonny Perdue, with his wife, Mary, takes the oath of office administered by Associate Justice Clarence Thomas in the U.S. Supreme Court Building, becoming the 31st U.S. secretary of agriculture.

The wait is over … Sonny Perdue was finally sworn in on Monday as the new secretary of agriculture, and it didn’t take him long to get to work.

After being sworn in, Perdue addressed USDA employees saying: “The only legacy that I seek is the only one that any grandparent or parent seeks – to be good stewards, and to hand off our nation, our home, our fields, our forests, and our farms to the next generation in better shape than we found it. … Making sure that Americans who make their livelihoods in the agriculture industry have the ability to thrive will be one of my top priorities. I am committed to serving the customers of USDA, and I will be an unapologetic advocate for American agriculture.”

Soon after the swearing-in was over, or maybe even before, ringing endorsements of Perdue taking the helm of the USDA came in.

National Pork Producers Council President, Ken Maschhoff, from Carlyle, Ill., says “Perdue knows agriculture; I think he’ll do well as agriculture secretary. … he takes over at a critical time for agriculture, with work starting on a new farm bill and possibly on free trade agreements that would open new markets to U.S. pork and other agricultural products.”                                 

America’s ag sector is banking on Perdue’s background as a farmer and veterinarian to serve the industry under the Trump administration. Barry Carpenter, president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute, issued a statement saying: “We look forward to working with Secretary Perdue to ensure the safety of the nation’s meat and poultry supply, expand trade opportunities around the world and to address the challenges facing our industry.”

National Corn Growers Association shares frustration with the delay in naming the secretary, as well as more work that needs to be done, in an issued statement, saying “USDA has been without a secretary for too long, but we are confident that Secretary Perdue will bring strong leadership to the department. There are still more than 200 political appointments at USDA that have yet to be made. We strongly urge the administration to move quickly in filling these positions.”

Perdue may be 70 years old, but he got a ringing endorsement from the National Young Farmers Coalition, the only national advocacy organization solely dedicated to supporting America’s young farmers and ranchers.

“With the rapidly aging farm population and the future of rural economies at stake, now is a critical time for leadership,” says National Young Farmers Coalition executive director and co-founder Lindsey Lusher Shute, who is herself a young farmer. “Already we’ve seen the very real consequences of delaying Mr. Perdue’s nomination — farmers and rural Americans have lacked the champion they need in the president’s cabinet. We hope that ends today, and we congratulate Secretary Perdue on his confirmation.”

American Farm Bureau Federation is excited about Perdue getting to work on behalf of American agriculture. Dale Moore, AFBF public policy executive director, says in an FB Focus interview: “One of the things that we’re excited about is that now we have a secretary of agriculture. Sonny Perdue was sworn in as the 31st secretary of agriculture after he confirmed by the Senate at a vote of 87-11 which is a pretty strong showing on any issue that comes through the Senate. So, what it means for agriculture is we now have the head of USDA, Sonny Perdue from Georgia, in place as secretary, and he can start that initial, very important work.”

Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union, echoes the relief that the wait for a confirmed secretary of agriculture is finally over. “Having endured months of the current farm crisis and drastic policy changes in Washington without a secretary of agriculture, family farmers and ranchers are relieved that Sonny Perdue has finally been confirmed to lead the USDA. We are hopeful Perdue will provide rural America with a strong voice in Washington. NFU stands ready to assist the new secretary as he navigates the myriad issues facing family agriculture and rural communities,” Johnson says in a statement.

I’m venturing a guess that Perdue’s influence was felt very quickly. President Donald Trump had said on the campaign trail that the United States would be getting out of the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico. A draft executive order had even been drawn up to that effect.

News channels report that Trump changed his mind after talking to Mexican President, Enrique Peña Nieto, and Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau. That may have had something to do with it, but I like to think that Perdue may have gotten a word to the president about the errors of his ways to completely withdraw from NAFTA. All sides agree that NAFTA should be renegotiated to the benefit of all three countries since a lot has changed in the market landscape since NAFTA was enacted under President Bill Clinton in 1994.                               

Keeping pace with the modern world, the USDA wasted little time in launching the official Twitter handle @SecretarySonny for the secretary to share thoughts with the social media world. Maybe that’s the only way he’ll be able to communicate with the Tweeter-in-Chief.

Welcome to the USDA, Sonny Perdue.