Sow and gilt housing National Pork Board

How to beat seasonal infertility challenges

In a free webinar, James Lehman, DVM, Merck Animal Health technical services veterinarian, will give hog producers management options and strategies to optimize the breeding herd’s performance.

For most of the Midwest, it is like we went from snow to 90 degrees days overnight. Summer heat brings on many challenges on a hog farm. According to research at the National Pork Board, heat stress can take a toll on breeding stock, robbing the farm’s financial bottom line.

Steve Pollman, Ph.D., calculated heat stress costs U.S. hog farmers $900 million a year in losses, about half in the grow-finish stage and the remainder in reproductive stage.

Research shows summer heat delays the onset of puberty in gilts, increases the number of sows with an irregular return to estrus after weaning and early pregnancy losses.

Swine returns are narrowing and leaving money on the table due to a decrease in breeding and farrowing performance is really not an option.    

Merck Animal Health recognizes that many farms struggle with seasonal swine infertility. In a free webinar, James Lehman, DVM, Merck Animal Health technical services veterinarian, will give hog producers management options and strategies to optimize the breeding herd’s performance.

Tune in July 12

Here’s what will be covered.

• Leveraging gilt potential and meeting breeding targets.
• Review of the sow reproductive cycle and how products on the market work to induce the heat cycle and synchronize estrus.
• Considerations for gilt and sow management practices and suggestions about when (and when not) to use therapies to maximize breeding herd performance.

The webinar is open to all hog farmers wanting to get a better handle on season infertility. Do not forget to register and join us July 12 at 2 p.m. (ET)/1 p.m. (CT).

If you cannot attend, but want access to the webinar, then register away. We’ll send you a link to the webinar archive, so you can view it at your own convenience.

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