Piglets National Pork Board

Inactivated Mycoplasma hyorhinis vaccine proves effective in pigs

A recent study demonstrated efficacy of an inactivated M. hyorhinis vaccine administered to 3-week old caesarian-derived colostrum-deprived piglets.

Source: American Association of Swine Veterinarians
Lameness and polyserositis in pigs caused by Mycoplasma hyorhinis are generally treated with antibiotics and may require multiple doses. The costs of these antibiotics combined with economic losses from culling and reduced feed conversion due to lameness are hardships to the swine producer.

A recent study demonstrated efficacy of an inactivated M. hyorhinis vaccine administered to 3-week old caesarian-derived colostrum-deprived piglets. Three doses of vaccine (high, medium and low) were evaluated and compared to a placebo control. M. hyorhinis challenge occurred three weeks after vaccination.

Pigs were observed for lameness and respiratory distress for three weeks following challenge. Pigs were then euthanized and a gross pathological evaluation for polyserositis and arthritis was performed.

A minimum immunizing dose of vaccine was defined as containing at least 7.41 × 107 CCU of M. hyorhinis per 2.0 mL dose as represented by the medium dose vaccine. This vaccine provided significant reductions in lameness and pericarditis with preventive fractions of 0.76 (95% CI [0.26, 0.92]) and 0.58 (95% CI [0.31, 0.74]), respectively, compared to the placebo control group.

A significant increase in post-challenge weight gain (P < .0001) was also achieved with this vaccine, with an average daily gain of 0.92 pounds per day compared to 0.57 pounds per day in the placebo group.

This research was conducted by Brian Martinson, Iowa State University and Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health; F.C. Minion, Iowa State University; and Whitney Zoghby, Kenneth Barrett, Lawrence Bryson, Rodney Christmas and Jeremy Kroll, Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health. Click here to read the full research report. 

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