Direct-fed microbial mitigates effects of PEDV challenge in nursery pigs

Quality Technology International Inc. announces publication of a major study on the beneficial effects of dietary CALSPORIN in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus-challenged, early-weaned nursery pigs at Iowa State University’s Swine Medicine Education Center by Paisley Canning, Locke Karriker and co-workers. The article appeared in the May-June 2017 issue of the Journal of Swine Health and Production [25(3):129-137].

PEDV was first confirmed in North America in April 2013 and since then has been observed in 30 states, with more than 9,000 confirmed cases. PEDV is a coronavirus that damages the villi of the gut in naïve, susceptible pigs causing fluid loss (diarrhea), dehydration, maldigestion and malabsorption, increased risk of septicemia due to decreased intestinal wall barrier functions, and mortality which may be high in suckling pigs. The incubation period is approximately two days and diarrhea lasts for seven to 14 days in older pigs.

CALSPORIN is a direct-fed microbial containing Bacillus subtilis C-3102 spores which are relatively stable to steam pelleting. By vegetating and consuming oxygen in the digesta, B. subtilis C-3102 provide more anaerobic conditions favoring the proliferation of indigenous Bifidobacterium and Lactobacilli. There are also beneficial immune responses and improved nutrient utilization when diets containing the Bacillus supplement are fed. This was the first PEDV challenge trial to evaluate the effects of CALSPORIN  in nursery pig feeds.

Canning et al. (2017) state, “the findings of this study support an association between feeding B. subtilis C-3102 and mitigating severity of PEDV lesions, including lower immunohistochemistry scores, lower atrophic enteritis scores, and higher villi-to-crypt ratios at day 4 post-infection in nursery pigs challenged with PEDV, compared to cohorts that did not receive B. subtilis C-3102.” Treated pigs had healthier guts with less damage from PEDV challenge.

Learn more at qtitechnology.com.

TAGS: Nutrition Feed
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